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Campbell County drunk driving defense attorney

When considering DUI laws, it is easy to forget that having an open container of an alcoholic beverage in your vehicle can have separate consequences. We will explain when and why a driver can be punished by Tennessee’s open container law, but know that if you are involved in any aspect of a DUI, it is imperative that you seek the legal guidance of an accomplished Tennessee DUI attorney. With a strong defense, you can protect your rights to the fullest extent. 

Tennessee’s Open Container Law

On paper, Tennessee’s open container law is fairly simple: If the driver has an alcoholic beverage that is open or the seal is broken and it is accessible, he or she can be punished. However, there is some fine print that should be understood about this rule. For instance, this law is designed to prevent a driver from consuming an alcoholic beverage while driving. It does not necessarily prevent passengers from having alcoholic beverages or for alcohol to be in areas of the vehicle that are inaccessible to the driver. 

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Campbell County motorcycle accident injury attorney

After receiving complaints from motorcyclists regarding wait times at stoplights, Tennessee joined 11 other states in legalizing safe crossing through red lights under certain circumstances. In 2003, Tennessee passed its law, which states that motorcyclists can pass through intersections with red lights after coming to a complete stop first. Of course, the law has limits to keep drivers safe from injuries as a result of collisions. Motorcyclists can only pass through red lights that are controlled by sensors, which in some cases can identify cars, but not motorcycles. Cyclists must proceed with caution to avoid causing a crash or being hit by another driver.

Understanding Tennessee Traffic Control Laws

Sensors that control traffic signals detect metal, and as motorcycles have evolved, more and more of these vehicles are manufactured using materials such as aluminum and fiberglass. As a result, sensors sometimes cannot detect when a motorcycle is waiting for the light to turn green. Therefore, motorcyclists have complained that the wait time at certain intersections was too long. Tennessee’s laws allow motorcycle drivers to cross through red lights only if:

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Campbell County pedestrian accident injury attorney

In 2018, 137 pedestrians were killed in Tennessee as a result of traffic accidents. This is a number that has been rising since 2014. Most pedestrian injuries are a result of negligence by a motorist; however, pedestrians also have rules that should be followed in order to protect themselves. The state of Tennessee aims to keep pedestrians as safe as possible with the installation of traffic signals, pedestrian crossing signs/signals, and crosswalks. Unfortunately, injuries and even wrongful death can occur when everyone does not follow the rules of the road.

What Are the Rules for Pedestrians When Crossing the Street?

Tennessee law states that all pedestrians have the right of way when crossing the road at an intersection marked with a crosswalk. In more busy intersections, a crossing signal will be utilized to let pedestrians know when it is their turn to cross. If there is not a crosswalk, pedestrians must yield to vehicular traffic. They must look both ways and only cross when cars are not present. 

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Campbell County auto accident injury attorney

During the winter months when the sun sets sooner and rises later, it is important for people to drive with their vehicles' headlights illuminated. Headlights are the most important equipment while driving in low-light conditions or darkness, because they allow the driver to see the roadway ahead. If a driver cannot see, he or she will be unprepared for obstacles in the road, in addition to other vehicles or pedestrians who are crossing the road. Not using headlights can lead to motor vehicle collisions and injuries that can range from minor to serious.

Tennessee’s Requirements for Using Headlights

According to Tennessee law, drivers must use their headlights starting a half-hour after sunset until a half-hour before sunrise. Lights must be visible from at least 200 feet away so that drivers have plenty of time to see each other on the road before getting too close.

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